Bucks County hill inventory by township

· landform inventories, notable hill
Authors

This inventory identifies each township’s most prominent hills, their elevations, and the nature of the bedrock forming the hill. Hills listed here are the named hills named on 1:24,000-scale United States Geological Survey topographic maps. Many Bucks County townships contained no named hills and if none were found that is indicated here

Bedminster Township

Relief of more than 200 feet marks differences between stream valley floors and drainage divides, but no named hills are identified on the maps.

Bensalem Township

No named hills are shown on the maps for Bensalem Township.

Bridgeton Township

Coffman Hill (elevation 826-Jurassic age diabase bedrock).

Bristol Township

Bristol Township is located along the northwest side of the southwest oriented Delaware River and is on the coastal plain without any significant hills.

Buckingham Township

Buckingham Mountain (elevation 520+ feet-Cambrian quartzite and Precambrian gneiss)

Doylestown Township

There are low hills in the Doylestown area, but they are not named on the maps.

Durham Township

Chestnut Hill (743 feet-Triassic quartz fanglomerate bedrock), Mine Hill (488 feet-Precambrian hornblende gneiss)

East Rockhill Township

Rock Hill (elevation 850 feet-Jurassic diabase)

Falls Township

Falls Township is located on the Delaware River floodplain and has no natural hills.

Haycock Township

Haycock Mountain (elevation 960+ feet-Jurassic diabase)

Hilltown Township

No named hills are shown on the map, although the community of Mount Pleasant is located on a hillcrest exceeding 680 feet and the community of Fair Hill is located on a hillcrest with an elevation of 621 feet (rising to 665 feet in a northeast direction). Bedrock under both communities is Triassic Lockatong Formation (argillite, shale, impure limestone, and calcareous shale)

Lower Makefield Township

There are no named hills on the maps.

Lower Southampton Township

Local relief of almost 200 feet can be found in Lower Southampton Township, but there are no named hills on the maps.

Middletown Township

The Neshaminy Creek valley floor is at least 100 feet lower than the surrounding uplands, but there are no named hills on the maps.

Milford Township

No named hills are shown on the maps although a hill north of Mumbauersville near the western tip of the township rises to more than 720 feet (Jurassic diabase surrounded by Triassic fanglomerate).

New Britain Township

No named hills are shown on the map although a southwest extension of Plumstead Hill between North Branch Neshaminy Creek and Pine Run reaches an elevation of 510 feet and on the northwest side of the North Branch Neshaminy Creek valley the hill at Naces Corner exceeds 640 feet in elevation. Both hills are composed of the Triassic Lockatong Formation (argillite, shale, impure limestone, and calcareous shale).

Newtown Township

There is relief of 100+ feet near stream valleys, but there are no named hills on the maps.

Nockamixon Township

No named hills were found on the maps, although the region is hilly and contains several high points with elevations exceeding 600 feet near the Delaware River valley where elevations are approximately 100 feet.

Northampton Township

There is local relief near stream valleys, but there are no named hills on the maps.

Plumstead Township

Plumstead Hill (elevation 569+ feet-Triassic Lockatong Formation, argillite, shale, impure limestone, calcareous shale)

Richland Township

Richland Township primarily contains relatively level land in the Quakertown area that is surrounded by hills on all sides that are located in other townships (see Haycock, Springfield, East and West Rock Hill, and Milford Townships)

Solebury Township

Solebury Mountain (460+feet-Jurassic diabase)

Springfield Township

The Lookout (elevation 911 feet-Jurassic diabase), Buckwampum Hill (elevation 870 feet-Triassic fanglomerate), Bitts Hill (elevation 520+ feet-Precambrian gneiss and Cambrian quartzite), Unnamed hill at north tip of township (elevation 880+ feet-Precambrian gneiss)

Tinicum Township

Relief ranges from about 100 feet in the Delaware River valley to more than 550 feet on drainage divides between streams, although no named hills are shown on the maps.

Upper Makefield Township

Jericho Mountain (elevation 420+ feet-Jurassic diabase)., Bowman Hill (elevation 400+ feet-Jurassic diabase)

Upper Southampton Township

This hilly township has relief of 100-200 feet, but there are no named hills on the maps.

Warminster Township

There are no named hills on the maps for Warminister Township.

Warrington Township

Local relief of 200 feet is found along the Little Neshaminy Creek north valley wall, but there are no named hills shown on the maps.

Warwick Township

The east-oriented Little Neshaminy Creek valley north wall rises 150 to 200 feet from the valley floor and forms a linear west to east oriented ridge, probably created by a north dipping resistant bedrock layer of the Triassic Stockton Formation, but the ridge is not named on the maps, nor were any other hills named.

West Rockhill Township

No named hills are identified on the maps, but south of Quakertown is a high hill reaching more than 760 feet (Jurassic diabase)

Wrightstown Township

Neshaminy Creek flows in a 200-foot deep valley, but there are no named hills shown on the maps.

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